It's How Medicine Should Be®

Physician Profile

-or-

call (888) 352-RUSH for help arranging an appointment

Madhu Soni, MD

Patient Feedback
Specialty:
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurophysiology
  • Neuromuscular Medicine
Board Certification:
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurophysiology
  • Neuromuscular Medicine
Faculty Rank: Associate Professor
Medical or Graduate Education: Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine
Residency: Rush University Medical Center - Neurology
Fellowship: Rush University Medical Center - Neurology
Clinical Expertise:
  • Aphasia
  • Brachial plexopathies
  • Guillain-Barre syndrome
  • Motor neuron disorders
  • Muscular dystrophy
  • Myasthenia gravis
  • Myopathy (muscle disease)
  • Nerve conduction study and electromyography
  • Peripheral entrapment neuropathies
Languages Spoken:
  • Hindi
Google Map

Below is a list of scientific publications for which this practitioner was either the primary author or a contributor. Citations come from PubMed, a database of biomedical literature, life science journals and online books. PubMed is a service of the US Library of Medicine at the National Institutes of Health. Click on the title of the cited work for more information (this will take you directly to PubMed.gov). Listings go back five years.

  1. Safety evaluation of zeaxanthin concentrate (OmniXan™): acute, subchronic toxicity and mutagenicity studies.
    Ravi KB, Raghunatha Reddy KR, Shankaranarayanan J, Deshpande JV, Juturu V, Soni MG
    Food Chem. Toxicol.
    2014 Oct
    72:30-9.
  2. Toxicologic evaluation of Dichrostachys glomerata extract: subchronic study in rats and genotoxicity tests.
    Kothari SC, Shivarudraiah P, Venkataramaiah SB, Gavara S, Arumugam SN, Soni MG
    Food Chem. Toxicol.
    2014 Jul
    69:120-31.
  3. Safety assessment of Apoaequorin, a protein preparation: subchronic toxicity study in rats.
    Moran DL, Marone PA, Bauter MR, Soni MG
    Food Chem. Toxicol.
    2013 Jul
    57:1-10.
  4. Autosomal dominant mutations in POLG and C10orf2: association with late onset chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia and Parkinsonism in two patients.
    Brandon BR, Diederich NJ, Soni M, Witte K, Weinhold M, Krause M, Jackson S.
    J Neurol. 2013
    2013 Jul
    260(7):1931-3. doi: 10.1007/s00415-013-6975-2. Epub 2013 May 30. No abstract available.
  5. Subchronic toxicity and mutagenicity/genotoxicity studies of Irvingia gabonensis extract (IGOB131).
    Kothari SC, Shivarudraiah P, Venkataramaiah SB, Gavara S, Soni MG
    Food Chem. Toxicol.
    2012 May
    50(5):1468-79.
  6. Safety assessment of mushroom ß-glucan: subchronic toxicity in rodents and mutagenicity studies.
    Chen SN, Nan FH, Chen S, Wu JF, Lu CL, Soni MG
    Food Chem. Toxicol.
    2011 Nov
    49(11):2890-8.
  7. Safety assessment of lutein and zeaxanthin (Lutemax 2020): subchronic toxicity and mutagenicity studies.
    Ravikrishnan R, Rusia S, Ilamurugan G, Salunkhe U, Deshpande J, Shankaranarayanan J, Shankaranarayana ML, Soni MG
    Food Chem. Toxicol.
    2011 Nov
    49(11):2841-8.
  8. Safety assessment of Cissus quadrangularis extract (CQR-300): subchronic toxicity and mutagenicity studies.
    Kothari SC, Shivarudraiah P, Venkataramaiah SB, Koppolu KP, Gavara S, Jairam R, Krishna S, Chandrappa RK, Soni MG
    Food Chem. Toxicol.
    2011 Dec
    49(12):3343-57.
  9. Safety assessment of a solid lipid curcumin particle preparation: acute and subchronic toxicity studies.
    Dadhaniya P, Patel C, Muchhara J, Bhadja N, Mathuria N, Vachhani K, Soni MG
    Food Chem. Toxicol.
    2011 Aug
    49(8):1834-42.
  10. Safety of vitamins and minerals: controversies and perspective.
    Soni MG, Thurmond TS, Miller ER, Spriggs T, Bendich A, Omaye ST
    Toxicol. Sci.
    2010 Dec
    118(2):348-55.
  11. Myopathic complications of medical disease.
    Soni M, Amato AA.
    Semin Neurol. 2009
    2009 Apr
    29(2):163-80. doi: 10.1055/s-0029-1213736. Epub 2009 Apr 15. Review.
Patient feedback information is available for physicians employed by Rush University Medical Center who have received 30 or more patient surveys. Responses are measured on a scale of 1 to 5, with 5 being the best score.
Number of Patient Surveys
46
Friendliness/courtesy of the care provider
4.9
Explanations the care provider gave you about your problem or condition
4.9
Concern the care provider showed for your questions or worries
4.9
Likelihood of your recommending this care provider to others
4.8
Care provider's efforts to include you in decisions about your treatment
4.9
Information the care provider gave you about medications
4.9
Instructions the care provider gave you about follow-up care
4.9
Your confidence in this care provider
4.9
Degree to which care provider talked with you using words you could understand
5.0
Amount of time the care provider spent with you
4.9
For more information about patient feedback, see the Quality Care section of the Rush University Medical Center website.